Children

Sleep and babies


Babies with sleep problems are more likely to become children with sleep problems.

In a study, published in the journal Pediatrics, mother-baby pairs were followed for three years to determine whether sleep problems were persistent in the children. They found that children who wake up frequently or sleep very little at 6, 12 or 24 months were 3 to 5 times more likely to continue sleeping equal to 2 years.

A previous study, also published in the journal Pediatrics, found that babies with sleep problems, defined as those who need more than an hour to fall asleep or those who wake up at least three times each night, at 8 months of age were about twice as likely of having the same sleep problems when they grew up.

Although this data may be disappointing, now a new study shows that approximately 30% of babies and young children with sleep problems continue to sleep poorly when they are one or two years old. But, this means that 70% of babies begin to sleep much better at preschool age. That is to say,

children who sleep poorly are very likely to end up sleeping well

.

In fact, a 2006 study found that most children between the ages of 8 and 24 months start to sleep better, and only 6% have persistent sleep problems.

But the question always arises whether these sleep problems are due to the child's own nature or the type of parenting.

In the case of children who, even though they grow up, still have trouble sleeping, the child's temperament and personality are probably to blame, but the environment also plays a role. Lack of a sleep routine can also get in the way of getting your child to rest through the night both as a baby and during preschool age.

Video: SLEEP MUSIC RELAXING MUSIC SLEEP u0026 MEDITATION MUSIC, SLEEPING MUSIC FOR DEEP SLEEPING SONGS TO SLEEP (November 2020).